Protagoras answer to how virtue can be

protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught.

In one of plato’s most noted texts, socrates meets protagoras, with whom he disagrees on whether political virtue can be taught socrates says it cannot, and as evidence for this he points out that at the public forum anyone can take the lead, no matter whether he is a worker, an iron forger, a sailor, rich or poor. Introduction the protagoras, like several of the dialogues of plato, is put into the mouth of socrates, who describes a conversation which had taken place between himself and the. Rather than directly question whether protagoras teaches virtue, whether virtue can be taught, or whether virtue is knowledge, socrates asks about the unity of the virtues 16 protagoras might want to assert their unity to show that they all come from the knowledge he teaches, but has to affirm their plurality in order to represent the views of. So, i do think that plato’s question of whether virtue can be taught should have been rephrased to ask whether virtue can be learned it would have made for a much more interesting and nuanced discussion, and, at least in part, an affirmative answer.

protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught.

Indeed, in the beginning of the dialogue protagoras has the upper hand, effectively resolving socrates’ doubts regarding the teachability of virtue socrates questions whether virtue can be taught, because, if virtue is teachable, then why do good men have bad sons. In claiming this, protagoras predicted a crucial tenet of modern social science: that it is utterly impossible to form a culture-free or context-free belief we can compare beliefs and cultures, but only to other beliefs and cultures. Protagoras likes to teach by giving long speeches socrates prefers the give-and take of question and answer part of socrates’ objection to protagorean speechifying is that it does not draw its premises from the audience and so cannot effectively persuade them.

In the protagoras, does socrates argue that the parts of virtue are like a pile of gold or does he think that they're like the parts of a face also, does protagoras ever admit that a courageous person can be ignorant or someone wise but not courageous. If protagoras is not disposed to answer, let him ask and i will answer and i will endeavour to show at the same time how, as i maintain, he ought to answer : and when i have answered as many questions as he likes to ask, let him in like manner answer me and if he seems to be not very ready at answering the precise question asked of him, you. Hey, i'm trying to figure out which text this passage is from i've searched through plato's protagoras but couldn't seem to find it there i need. In spite of protagoras' clear answer thatexcellence is a single thing, the human being can possess a certain virtue, but at the same time he lacks another for example, not anyone who possesses bravery necessarily possesses justice (1953) protagoras' doctrine of justice and virtue in the protagoras of plato,the journal of hellenic.

The protagoras is an inquiry into whether virtue can be taught socrates tries to show that it can by arguing that all the virtues are identical, and that they are all knowledge toward the end of. Protagoras became a teacher and used to teach and profess the ideals related to politics and virtue he was occupied with the matter of whether virtue can be taught or not throughout this philosophical career. Summary in this dialogue which follows protagoras, socrates and a young athenian man, meno discuss virtue and it’s meaning and teachability that is the first question which is asked: is virtue something that is taught or something that is inborn. Socrates takes on protagoras, the most famous sophist in greece get into pleasure, evil, knowledge and virtue with this classic dialogue.

Protagoras is also credited for devising the first known and recorded method of legal arguments in court using seven points: narration, appeal, entreaty, promise, interrogation, answer, judgement and its enforcement. Protagoras of abdera (c485-415 bce) is considered the greatest of the sophists of ancient greece and the first to promote the philosophy of subjectivism, arguing that interpretation of reality is relative to the individual protagoras was the fir. Ostensibly, this dialogue between protagoras and socrates is a discussion about the essential nature of virtue and whether virtue can be taught socrates gets invited to meet the famous sophist protagoras.

Protagoras answer to how virtue can be

protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught.

Virtue is indeed teachable, argues protagoras, because political systems are founded on the basis that all citizens can possess virtue similarly, systems of criminal justice are based on the notion that people can be reformed—that is, taught how to be virtuous. I will demonstrate that the psychological search can be outlined through various passages in the protagoras and laches (sections 3–5), that the conceptual search can be outlined through various passages in the euthyphro and meno (sections 6–7), and that the meno finally verifies that these two searches are in fact distinct (section 8. Protagoras 100 the fact that socrates is the explicit narrator is a significant point to consider in conducting an analysis of the dialogue in my critique of the meno i pointed out how the content of the dialogue can be viewed in a particular way because of the fact that there is. I believe that we can come to answer both questions, “what is virtue” and “is virtue teachable” posed in the protagoras and the meno by drawing on the ideas of anamnesis and eros as they appear in the meno , phaedrus , and symposium.

  • Plato’s protagoras is a brilliant dialogue and a splendid piece of argumentation it incorporates a picture of the sophist and a glimpse of the cultured aristocrats of the periclean age, facts.
  • He draws the conclusion that to an observer he and protagoras would seem as crazy, having argued at great lengths only to mutually exchanged positions with socrates now believing that virtue can be taught and protagoras that all virtues are one instead of his initial position (361a.
  • The two main speakers divide on these questions in an unexpected way: socrates, who believes that virtue cannot be taught, and that he does not teach it, defends the unity of all virtues with wisdom, even courage protagoras, who believes that virtue can be taught, and that he teaches it, denies that courage is wisdom or any sort of knowledge.

Some sophists claimed to be able to teach knowledge, wisdom, and virtue, apparently on the basis that such qualities were defined by majority opinion (hence, if you can convince the majority that you are wise, then you are wise. If protagoras is not disposed to answer, let him ask and i will answer and i will endeavour to show at the same time how, as i maintain, he ought to answer: and when i have answered as many questions as he likes to ask, let him in like manner answer me and if he seems to be not very ready at answering the precise question asked of him, you. I answer, socrates, he said, that all these qualities are parts of virtue, and that four out of the five are to some extent similar, and that the fifth of them, which is courage, is very different from the other four, as i prove in this way: you may observe that many men are utterly unrighteous, unholy, intemperate, ignorant, who are. So plato, in juxtaposing socrates with protagoras, is surely most interested in whether protagoras can defend the idea of improvement in virtue without appeal to any absolute standards for what has value, and whether he can justify his teaching without admitting objective knowledge of any truths.

protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught. protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught. protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught. protagoras answer to how virtue can be Protagoras began by asserting, and socrates by denying, the teachableness of virtue, and now the latter ends by affirming that virtue is knowledge, which is the most teachable of all things, while protagoras has been striving to show that virtue is not knowledge, and this is almost equivalent to saying that virtue cannot be taught.
Protagoras answer to how virtue can be
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